Tag Archives: book

For The Win Book Review- Sunkissed

Every now and then on my blog, I’ll review a book that I think may be of interest to college students. It’s also a crafty way of getting me to read for pleasure again. Ever since starting grad school, all my reading became purely scholarly, and I suddenly realized I lost my passion for fiction. As a result, For The Win Book Reviews were born!

Today’s book review is for Sunkissed, by Carys Jones.

(This review was done by Jasmine of the For The Win Review Team)

In the small village of Fandova, Dawn Summers lays dying. Her fiancé, Thomas Weeville, wrings his hands in desperation. Her mother resides in the comfort that her daughter will die soon and be free of the disease. However, that does not come to pass…

Spurred on by his love for Dawn, Thomas seeks a solution to save his ailing bride-to-be. His actions lead Dawn on the path of her destiny – which was set forth by her own father, a powerful and influential supernatural being who’s on the run after consorting with Dawn’s mother.

In her transformation, Dawn is turned by the reclusive and mysterious town doctor, a deceivingly evil and decrepit man. The transformation lends less than desirable results for Dawn, but not Thomas, who greedily sees the new power Dawn has obtained. Through his own efforts, Thomas succeeds in finally embracing the evil which has always rested within his heart. His only shred of humanity left lies in his love for Dawn, who sees only a monster in herself and now with him.

Distraught by Thomas’ post-transformation actions one night, Dawn opens the door, letting the killing sunlight hit her face. It is then that she discovers a secret about herself and her lineage, something of which was prophesied by ancient creatures long ago.

Dawn’s story in Sunkissed is about her transformation and discovery of what she is destined to become – the harbinger of change for all her kind. The author does a good job of capturing the details of Dawn’s and Thomas’ post-transformations and the difference on how they embodied light and dark. However, the first half of the book was choppy in its delivery – requiring smoother transitions between character narrations and point-of-view. The author made progress on her transitions later on in the book, making it more of an enjoyable, but relatively simple, read. Sunkissed does not and will not offer any kind of depth. It is a normal supernatural romance novel that, for this reviewer, only took a couple of hours to finish.

Although the novel did start off choppy and a little dull, it transitioned in the latter half of the story into something more interesting and with smoother transitions. This makes it important to note that the author does need to put more thought into the way her storyline progresses. Pace is an important element in literature. In addition, the ending was a bit abrupt, but the assumption is that this is the first in a series – so this reviewer is a little more forgiving on that aspect. However, it is important to close some elements of the story for the reader, so they are feeling more satisfied with the ending, leaving them excited and willing to read the next book in the series. Sunkissed felt like all the threads were still open even to the very end – nothing felt completely resolved… yet.

As a last note, the author should be more careful when world building. It was difficult establishing where in the U.S. Fandova could have possibly been. One guess is the Midwest but the initial world presented struck as old-world Europe rather than early 1850’s U.S. Midwest – especially with the term “village” rather than “town”, the term that would have been used even in a sparsely populated town like Fandova. Some of the clichés of “going to the West” (or even “Mexico”… Mexico??), which Dawn expressed interest traveling to, seemed stemmed out of a stereotypical and inaccurate “impression” of the U.S. and its history at the time, rather than the actual history and mentality at the time. Given the author’s roots in England, this common impression of U.S. during this time period is understandably but not necessarily excusable. This reviewer wished that the author had taken more time in the first part of her novel when building the location. This may lead to another reason the latter half of the book was more enjoyable from a cultural and historical perspective – given its location in modern New York City. Even to most Europeans, New York City is fairly recognizable and understood.

Overall, Sunkissed rates 3 out of 5 stars. Its drawbacks were not nearly enough to detract this reviewer from wanting to hear the rest Dawn’s sage and how she will change the world while running from an ancient evil and an obsessed ex-lover.

Advertisements

Author Interview for college-themed mystery novel at Twinja Book Reviews

As I’m sure you may have noticed by now, I’m a college enthusiast. I love everything about it. So much so, that I wrote a book about it. Instead of going the traditional route with it and writing a “how-to” guide or a research paper, I decided to create a mystery novel set on a college campus.

BookCoverPreviewNew (3)

The title is called “Halls of Ivy”, and Twinja Book Reviews, a blog dedicated to multiculturalism in fiction, has agreed to do an author interview with me! Find out more about what it took to create a mystery novel with a plethora of characters on a college campus and make it interesting. Plus, there’s a giveaway that ends today at the site for a bunch of different books. Be sure to enter!

For The Win Book Review: The Consequences of Forever

Every now and then on my blog, I’ll review a book that I think may be of interest to college students. It’s also a crafty way of getting me to read for pleasure again. Ever since starting grad school, all my reading became purely scholarly, and I suddenly realized I lost my passion for fiction. As a result, For The Win Book Reviews were born!

Today’s book review is The Consequences of Forever, by Kaitlyn Oruska.

The Consequences of Forever is a story about a teenage girl named Lainey whose life changes completely after realizing that she’s pregnant at 15. The novel follows Lainey and her boyfriend Adam as they struggle with the idea that they’re going to have a child.

This is my first foray into this type of novel. I’ve always been a mystery and thriller reader, so I was hesitant at first to check it out. However, in an effort to expand my genre horizons, I pushed myself to get the book and see what it was about. I was very pleasantly surprised at the story the author told us through Lainey’s eyes. The plot itself is very straightforward: a girl she finds out she is pregnant, deals with the ramifications of being pregnant in high school. However, what really makes the book truly shine is the characters that the author brings to life.

I instantly found myself liking Lainey from the beginning of the book. She was grounded, idealistic, if a bit unsecure at times. She wasn’t angsty or annoying, traits I often found in stories starring teenagers. The emotions she felt and her reactions to her pregnancy seemed realistic to me. Her boyfriend, Adam, was very supportive of her upon learning about it, yet still exhibited enough flaws as a character to make him seem human, rather than an idealistic caricature he seemed like at first glance.

The author did a great job of developing their relationship. I could sense how much they’ve matured as individuals as well as a couple from the beginning of the book to the end. I noticed growth in not only them, but even the several supporting characters they interacted with. This attention to detail to every character introduced is what really made the story feel organic and engaging.

The title of the book seemed a bit cliché at first, but it makes a lot of sense within the context of the story. It really takes until the end of the book to appreciate the choice of words in the title. I thought that was pretty nifty, though I can see how it may scare away new readers of the genre.

The only things that bothered me in the book were the over-explanation of some things and their redundancy. A lot of times I felt the monologues were necessary, really driving the point across. But sometimes I felt as if Lainey kept making the same point over and over, and it seemed to slow down the plot progression. A lot of the chapters consisted of minute details that made it feel like I was reading a teenage girl’s diary, but I will admit some of those details really added to some of the revelations that came afterwards.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book. Though I’ve never been pregnant, I felt I could relate to many of Lainey’s worries, such as dealing with a broken family, judgment from peers, and uncertainty of the future. Problems that may seem minor to others can mean the world to the individual facing them. We all face personal battles, and Lainey’s experience was inspiring, to say the least.

I would definitely recommend this book to readers looking for an inspiring read and like detailed character growth in their stories. You can buy the book online on Amazon and several other websites. You can also find the author’s website here.

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: